How Smart Dust Could Be Used To Monitor Human Thought

A few years ago a team of researchers from Brown University made headlines after they successfully demonstrated how a paralyzed woman who had lost the use of her arms and legs could control a robotic arm using her brainwaves. In a video, Cathy Hutchinson imagines drinking a cup of coffee, and the robotic arm brings the cup to her lips.

The scene is amazing, but also a little disturbing. Hutchinson is connected to the robotic arm through a rod-like “pedestal” driven into her skull. At one end of the pedestal, a bundle of gold wires is attached to a tiny array of microelectrodes that is implanted in the primary motor cortex of Hutchison’s brain. This sensor, which is about the size of a baby aspirin, records her neural activity. At the other end of the pedestal is an external cable that transmits neural data to a nearby computer, which translates the signals into code that guides the robotic arm.

This method, known as BrainGate, pretty much defined state-of-the-art brain-computer interfaces at the end of the last decade. If the idea of a rod-through-the-head computer interface makes you cringe, you are not alone.

For some time, a small team of researchers at UC Berkeley has been working on plans for a less invasive, wireless monitoring system. Earlier this month, they released a draft paper: “Neural Dust: An Ultrasonic, Low Power Solution for Chronic Brain-Machine Interfaces.”

Dongjin Seo, a graduate student in UC Berkeley’s electrical engineering and computer science department, authored the paper under the supervision of senior faculty members, including Michel Maharbiz who has famously created cyborg beetles for the US Defense Department.

Seo said the researchers’ goal is to build an implantable system that is ultra-miniature, extremely compliant, and scalable to be viable for a lifetime, for brain-machine interfaces. “With neural dust, due to its extreme scalability, this framework can be applied for Obama’s BRAIN initiative, which necessitates large-scale, parallel, and real-time monitoring of neurons,” Seo explained.

The Berkeley researchers propose to sprinkle the brain with tiny, dust-sized, wireless sensors. This would reduce the risk of infection from wiring up scores of sensors placed throughout the brain and limit the trauma to one initial operation. During that operation, the skull would be opened, and sensors would be inserted into the brain. At the same time a separate transceiver would be placed directly under the skull but above the brain. The transceiver would communicate with the sensors via ultrasound.

Another battery-powered transceiver outside the skull would receive data transmissions from the chip inside the skull and supply wireless power to it.  As the paper notes, this type of power transfer is already used in a variety of medical applications, including cochlear implants. Seo said the amount of power being proposed is within FDA and IEEE guidelines.

The idea of neural dust immediately sparked the imagination of futurists after the paper was published on arXiv.org on July 8. “The brilliance of this system is that it could potentially allow scientists to see what’s going on with thousands, tens of thousands, or even hundreds of thousands of neurons inside the brain at once,” wrote Ramez Naam, a senior associate at the Foresight Institute and author of “More Than Human: Embracing the promise of biological enhancement.”

But would neural dust have practical use for the growing industry of mind-controlled computer games and brain training apps? Jon Cowan, founder ofNeuroTek, is dubious. NeuroTek’s Peak Achievement Training has been used at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, as well as at other Olympic centers from China to Norway.

“[Neural dust] doesn’t have much practical promise because of the surgery it would require,” Cowan said. “I don’t think they’ll find too many people that would volunteer for it.” Cowan noted existing ways for measuring brainwaves that rely on external sensors may be crude, but they’re effective enough for today’s applications.

“We really believe this is a practical system and, more importantly, we think this is potentially a powerful framework for achieving what Obama has announced,” Seo said. Still, he pointed out that the paper is a draft. “It’s a concept paper,” he said. “It’s a theoretical study of what we think is possible in the realm of neural recording.”

By publishing the paper on arXiv.org, an online collection of preprints of scientific work, the team is hoping to spur involvement and feedback from scientists in different fields. Lots of challenges remain to be overcome before neural dust will be ready for live testing.

Linksys X3500 Provide Two Line Internet

Home computer network equipment manufacturers Linksys launches Wi-Fi modem router X3500 series in Jakarta, Wednesday (17/07/2013). This product is equipped with dual band capability, at a frequency of 2.4 GHz and 5GHz, which can be run simultaneously at speeds up to 450Mbps + 300Mbps.

Networking Linksys Indonesia Sales Manager, Kevin Kurniawan said, X3500 products provide two interface internet connection, ie ADSL and WAN.

ADSL ports by default has been available in the X3500, so the ADSL internet cable from the provider, such as Telkom Speedy, can be directly used. As for cable modem subscribers, such as First Media, or who already have ADSL modem, can use the WAN port on the X3500.

It also provides a modem router 4 LAN ports and a USB port that can be used to share content with an external hard disk or connect to the printer. With this, the X3500 can connect the computer to the mobile device, tablet, television, and so on.

“If the user has the flash drive already contains a song or video, then plugged into the router, users can stream from a smartphone or tablet via the DLNA network,” said Kevin.

Linksys offers Cisco Connect Express mobile app for iOS and Android devices, which can be used for remote management, monitoring, and firmware upgrades.

X3500 modem router, which target the middle to upper market segment, has begun to be marketed in Indonesia at a price of Rp 1.7 million.

Although Belkin Linksys was acquired in March 2013 by then, but still retain Linksys Cisco logo at the top of the X3500. According to Kevin, Linksys Networking Indonesia still protect products with warranty and after sales service.

Official AMD APU Delivers Third Generation

To offer a more affordable solution to gamers with a limited budget, AMD is now officially back to bring innovation newest generation APU processor AMD A-Series APU Elite 2013 or better known as Richland passcode.
AMD APU AMD APU Authorized Delivers Third Generation computer coverage of local events
Official AMD APU Delivers Third Generation
“AMD A-Series APU Elite 2013 delivers computing experience and superb entertainment for the Desktop PC assemblers and mainstream gamers in Indonesia, especially through the balance of CPU and GPU architectures that work together in a single chip APU. Thanks to the unique technology APU, consumers who assemble PCs with AMD A-Series APU Elite will gain tremendous experience in dealing with graphics and computing workloads are increasingly complex, “said Jenny Susanto, Indonesia Country Manager of AMD.
APU processor chip is a technological innovation that combines the power of AMD CPU and GPU in a single chip processor. In the third generation, AMD GPU present collaboration with AMD Radeon 8000 series CPU performance that can run on the 4.0Ghz speed.
To offer convenience to the consumer, the third generation AMD APU is designed compatible with FM2 motherboard and is compatible with RAM memory for gaming DDR3-2133MHz to maximize its performance can increase up to 13%. In addition, there is also support from other AMD technologies such as AMD Turbo Core, AMD Eyefinity, AMD Dual Graphics support and Wireless Display.
For the price, APU A10-6800k with AMD Radeon Graphics HD 8670D is priced at around U.S. $ 142, APU A8-6600K with AMD Radeon Graphics HD 8570D approximately U.S. $ 112 and APU A6-6400 with AMD Radeon Graphics HD 8470D costs about U.S. $ 69.

Smartphone Advan Vandroid S5

Unggulkan Big Screen

The success of one of the Korean manufacturer to sell millions of smartphone unit have made a great sailing inspired many other manufacturers. However, to be sold at more competitive prices, various gadgets “rival” comes with fewer features. This is carried by Vandroid S5 from Advan.

u4-435-S5 AdvanAdvan Vandroid by PCplus quite on par with ZA987 OneScribe of Zyrex that appeared almost simultaneously. ˝ 5.3 capacitive screen with a resolution of 480 × 800 pixels here look quite a contrast and not inferior to similar products from leading brands. Advan S5 Vandroid called as “Smart Note” which is interpreted as a smart gadget with a variety of features that support mobile activities. This seems to be a campaign to educate consumers.

Smartphone MediaTek MT6575 is powered by a 1GHz processor (ARM v7) plus 512MB of main memory is actually not very special and still like most other large screen smartphones. Booting the system fairly quickly became hallmarks Vandroid Advan S5.

Here also 4GB of internal memory available. Unfortunately, only 2.2 GB of available capacity that can be used. It was only by the system / application alias can not be accessed directly by the user. As a result, users must add a microSD card (up to 32GB) as a storage media to store data.

The process of exploration in the menu Vandroid Advan S5 with Android 4 systems is quite smooth because of the PowerVR SGX531 GPU to handle graphics side. Advan smartphone also includes six important sensor that is not provided other competitors. With all those fittings plus dual SIM support, he can be had for less than Rp. 2 million. This makes it an attractive alternative products in the ranks of the many large screen smartphones on the market today.

Maybe not as perfect Advan S5 Vandroid similar smartphones from popular brands. When held casing feels slippery. However, to simply live day-to-day activities of this product is sufficient. At more competitive prices, even compared to other local brands, this smartphone is certainly attractive alternative option for on a budget.

Asus Memo Pad HD 7 review: Vivid screen barely outshines slow performance

The good: The Asus Memo Pad HD 7 rocks an impressively colorful screen, features a bevy of useful customization options, and comes in at a budget price.

The bad: Its performance is mediocre and the touch screen is sometimes unresponsive. The plastic build gives it a toy-like feel and it isn’t very comfortable to hold. The dull design lacks panache.

The bottom line: For those looking to save a buck, for its low price, the Asus Memo Pad HD 7 has a bevy of useful features, though there are better performing options out there.

With the Asus Memo Pad HD 7, you really get what you pay for. The HD 7 earns its low price with a lackluster design and sluggish performance. It’s not very comfortable to hold for long periods of time, and aside from being offered in a variety of different colors, lacks a coolness other tablets try hard to aspire to.

Its performance is meekly mediocre, and consistent lagging combined with a sometimes unresponsive touch screen make the tablet best suited for simple tasks like browsing and reading.

That said, the HD 7 is a refreshing upgrade from its predecessor and its best feature is the 7-inch IPS screen that displays an impressively wide range of colors which facilitate a visually richer experience than the original Nexus 7.

If you’re on a strict budget, the Asus Memo Pad is an inexpensive and functional small tablet, but if you can spare the change, a new Nexus 7 is the better choice.

Design
Even though the tablet shares similar dimensions with the Nexus 7, it’s nowhere near as sleek or comfortable in design. The tablet fits fine in one hand, even for people with smaller hands like me, yet, despite its light weight, the design doesn’t lend itself to comfortable holding over lengthy periods of time.

The back panel protrudes slightly, and the corners slightly dig into your palms when holding it in both hands, instead of the flush, smoothly curved edges of the original Nexus 7. I often found myself wanting to put the device down after using it for awhile — not because I was done using it — but because holding it became tiresome.

The Asus Memo Pad HD 7 comes in navy blue, white, hot pink, and lime green. The navy blue version is the only one that has a back with a matte finish. The dark shade of blue attracts a minimal amount of fingerprints that are only highly visible from certain angles. The back panel is smooth and comfortable to the touch but can be a bit slippery without a tight grip.

In comparison, the reflective plastic backsides of the other colors looks less chic, but its texture helps one grip the device significantly better than the matte finish does. I personally prefer a back panel with a grippier texture, like the Nexus 7 (2012), because it enhances my comfort level in a way that extends the amount of time I can hold the device.

Since they’re both made by Asus, the Memo Pad HD 7 and the Nexus 7 (2012) share similar design elements. The power button and volume rocker on the right edge look almost identical in shape, while the rear speakers are similarly located towards the bottom edge of the tablet.

The front of the tablet is typically simple, with an Asus logo on the bottom bezel and a front-facing camera on the top. There is no ambient light sensor, therefore no automatic brightness setting.

The Memo Pad HD 7’s headphone jack, microphone pinhole, and Micro-USB port are all located on the top edge, with the microSD expansion slot — which is expandable up to 32GB — around the corner on the left edge. There are no ports on the bottom edge, but the speaker sits on the bottom of the tablet’s back, keeping the 5-megapixel rear camera on top company.

Asus Application Suite
The tablet comes loaded with the Asus Application Suite and features apps that range from useful to creative. The simple additions include a calendar, to-do list, and file manager, and it comes with 16GB of Asus WebStorage cloud service for one year.

Some of the apps that are geared towards family use include App Locker, which allows you to put passwords on specific apps; Asus Artists, where you can create “paintings” or greeting cards; and Asus Story, which helps you organize your photos into albums, or as they call them, “stories.”

The tablet comes with Power Saver, a battery saving feature that comes in handy if you’re trying to squeeze the most out of a low battery.

The custom mode lets you pick the specific functions that the power-saving option affects. For example, you can set a low screen brightness for listening to music, a higher one for watching video, and no power-saving function for reading books. When enabled, it significantly helped extend the battery life when it was low and the highly customizable options.

Floating apps
One of the most interesting and useful features on the tablet is the floating menu. On the Android navigation bar, there’s a button to the left of the back button that activates the floating menu.

When activated, a small menu pops up above the navigation bar that contains a selection of floating apps that you can quickly access without having to close whatever app you’re currently using. Since the apps “float” on the screen, on top of whatever is already open, it’s almost like a multiwindow option, but they can only perform simple tasks and can’t compare to the multiwindow functions that the Microsoft Surface or some of the Samsung Galaxy tablets provide.

Floating apps are an easy way to multitask, and I liked the ability to use the browser while watching video, but not all streaming video services continue to play while a floating app is open. With the exception of a few floating apps, including the calculator and compass, Netflix did not let me use most of the floating apps while simultaneously watching video, although YouTube did.

Despite providing an easy way to multitask, the floating apps don’t have the same functionality as the fullscreen app and are limited in their capabilities; the YouTube app only shows recommended videos — you can’t search — and the Twitter app displays only one tweet at a time. There is a limited amount of floating apps, and although the floating menu is customizable, not all downloaded apps have the ability to be floating ones.

Speaker features
The Memo Pad HD 7 houses stereo speakers with Asus SonicMaster audio technology and Audio Wizard software. Although the speakers aren’t great, the number of specific audio settings are. The tablet allows you to manually adjust separate volume settings for app audio, notifications, and alarms.

Asus Launches Multi-Series External Hard Disk is Not Boring

PONTIANAK – Asus, the main leader in the digital era has once again expanded its product line in Indonesia. Asus after winning a strong position in the notebook industry and penetrated the tablet and smartphone segment with innovative products such as Pad MeMO, Fonepad, and PadFone, ASUS is now presenting the ranks of the external hard disk.
In the early stages, there are four models of 2.5-inch external hard disk Asus marketed in Indonesia. The four models are series DL, KR, Leather II, and AN300 series.
Manager of Product Management and Marketing, Asus Indonesia, Juliana Cen, said user request on storage devices continues to increase along with the increasing use of the computing device itself.
“In order to meet the needs of these users, we present an external storage media products are not simply a storage medium, but also a product with aesthetic and beauty,” he told the Tribune, Sunday (28/07/2013).
Juliana states, external hard disk does not have to be boring. With the design of David Lewis, DL Asus HD Ext 2.5 “- 1TB, turn the computing experience with thinness. Moreover, Asus DL 2.5” can work without the need for instant installation and driver.
“Hard disk is fitted with antishock features for data protection. Use elegant design makes a stylish special cable can be stored so that the disk is still looks neat when not in use,” he explained.
While other models, Asus KR 2.5 “Ext HDD 1TB presents unique colors, namely brown terran. External hard disk that comes with the glossy texture and charming appearance. With a capacity of 1TB, KR 2.5” supports a hectic lifestyle with spectacular durability and features easier is used.
While Asus Leather II 2.5 “500GB Ext HDD, not just accessories, but a lifestyle statement. For users who value their data, the hard disk is a charming leather-clad luxury solutions.
“Hard disk is equipped with a super-speed USB 3.0 for the fastest transfer process at this time, and can work with all file formats, without requiring installation or drivers,” said Juliana.
In addition, there is still one more model that Asus AN300 2.5 “500GB Ext HDD has a charming color and made of aluminum. Asus AN300 change the perception of external hard disk with the old-fashioned charming style. Asus AN300 stylish, ultra lightweight, ultra thin, and can work at any time with immediate access through USB 3.0 is ready to bring the data owner anywhere without a problem but still stylish.
Asus AN300 also works well with laptops, desktops, and other media players, thus helping the owner move data quickly, safely, and easily.

Intel will offer ‘Broadwell’ SOC to battle Calxeda, AMD

Intel has updated its road map with a new, low-power server chip to help it ward off competition from Calxeda and other makers of low-power chips.

The new chip will be based on Broadwell, a microarchitecture to be introduced next year as the successor to Intel’s Haswell design. But this processor will be a system-on-chip, setting it apart from Intel’s other Xeon server products.

SOCs combine several components onto a single chip to reduce power consumption and space requirements. In the server market, they’re often used in micro-servers, a type of low-power server used for large-scale, online workloads.

Intel already offers SOCs in its Atom family of chips, but Atom has its own microarchitecture. The new chip announced Monday will be Intel’s first SOC that uses the same microarchitecture as its more powerful Xeon chips.

“With this new product, we’ll be delivering the best of both worlds: high performance and high density,” said Diane Bryant, general manager of Intel’s data center and connected systems group, at an Intel event in San Francisco.

She didn’t give a name for the new chip but said it will ship next year. It will be manufactured on a 14-nanometer process and include integrated I/O, networking, and application accelerators, Bryant said.

The chip essentially allows Intel to straddle the gap between its current Atom processors, which focus on low power consumption, and its Xeon processors, which are tuned for higher performance but use more electricity.

“They’re trying to cover the whole market. They’ve decided it’s better to have a little bit of overlap than to have any gaps,” said industry analyst Nathan Brookwood of Insight64.

The chip comes at a time of heightened competition in the server market. Rivals such as Calxeda and Advanced Micro Devices are building low-power SOCs using designs from UK chip architecture company ARM, and the new chip from Intel is its latest response to that trend.

Intel didn’t say on Monday if the new chip will be branded as a Xeon or an Atom. Its place between the two product lines could create some confusion for customers, Brookwood said, though he thinks Intel will eventually decide on Xeon.

It’s not the only chip Intel has for low-power servers. The company recently began shipping a Xeon E3 processor based on the Haswell core, and versions of that chip based on Broadwell are expected next year. They will be “general-purpose” Xeons, as opposed to SOCs specifically for low-power, high-density systems.

In its Atom family, Intel will begin shipping a new chip later this year code-named Avoton, based on a new chip core known as Silvermont. Compared with the current Atom core, Avoton will offer “a 3x improvement in power at the same performance level, or a 5x increase in performance at the same power,” according to Bryant.

Together with AMD, Toshiba Offer Notebook PC

JAKARTA – Toshiba notebook to hit the market back in the homeland. Having recently launched a dual function, this ultrabook, Toshiba re-introduced its notebook personal computer (PC) in Indonesia under the name Toshiba Satellite C40D.

Toshiba Satellite C40D which is the development of TV technology from Toshiba, claimed more powerful and rich graphics. The kitchen was redone powered by Quad-Core AMD A4 APU.

Channel Manager of Toshiba Singapore, Albert Susilo states, with the audio technologies V2 Toshiba Audio Enhancement Technology, the consumer ear audio quality spoiled by sharp and clear. “Crystal clear,” he said at the launch of the Toshiba Satellite C40D at Le Meridien Jakarta, Monday (8/7).

With a unique design and is claimed to be better than the previous generation, Toshiba Satellite C40D available with spans 14.0 HD screen. The price is pegged at under $ 5 million. “Toshiba Satellite C40D be available in the Indonesian market in early July at a price of USD 439,” said Albert Susilo.

While AMD Indonesia Country Manager, Jenny Susanto said all products from AMD’s APU is designed to provide the best computing experience. “This notebook is instantly able to deliver sharp image quality, color, and more life to improve the consumer experience in watching the video,” he said.

Jenny added, AMD has always made ​​a breakthrough to provide the latest experience that not only includes the traditional architecture, but also the latest graphics processing interface. To provide experience productivity, graphics, and entertainment, this notebook is reinforced with a variety of the latest exclusive technology from Toshiba and AMD.

HP Series 600 G1 ProOne Simplify Daily Fulfillment

JAKARTA – HP Series ProOne ProDesk 600 600 G1 and G1 show business for AiO devices and desktop PCs with the latest design and latest selection of 4th generation Intel Core processor at an affordable price.
Each device allows the user to easily meet daily business needs with a choice of Windows 8, Windows 7, HP Device Support Assistant, HP Client Security applications and strong to protect the data, device and identity.
Increased productivity with HP ePrint for quick and easy wireless printing, as well as DTS Sound for rich audio sound.
ProOne HP AiO 600 G1 is the enterprise-class has a space-saving design with powerful PC performance and secure.
HP ProDesk G1 600 series offers the most popular form factor with the availability of a stable cycle of up to 30 months and to meet everyday business needs with performance and reliability.
Multitasking helped with the choice of storage solutions solid-state drive that makes files and applications together quickly.

ASUS PQ321Q UltraHD Monitor Review: Living with a 31.5-inch 4K Desktop Display

Many consider me to be a 4K hater. The past few trade shows I’ve attended have been pushing it on consumers to replace their TVs, but I see less value in it. When it comes to a computer display, it is a different game. Unlike a 50” TV, we sit close to our monitors, even if they are 30” in size. We also have no worries about a lack of native content, since everything is rendered on the fly and native. There are no issues with the lack of HDMI 2.0, as DisplayPort 1.2 can drive a 3840×2160 screen at 60 Hz.

When it comes to 4K on the desktop, my main question is: how much difference will I see? ASUS is one of the first with a HiDPI display in the PQ321Q. While not truly 4K, it is a 3840×2160 LCD display that can accept an Ultra High Definition (UHD) signal over HDMI and DisplayPort. It also clocks in at a wallet-stretching $3,500 right now. The question is, are we seeing the future with displays here, or are we seeing a niche product?

What does 4K/UHD/HiDPI bring to the desktop? We’ve seen it for a few years now in smartphones and tablets, making their smaller screens more usable for reading and general work. My initial thought is more desktop space, as that is what it has meant before. With a 32” monitor and a pixel density this high, running it without any DPI scaling leads to a desktop where reading text is a huge pain. Instead I believe most users will opt for DPI scaling so elements are larger and easier to read. Now you have something similar to the Retina screen on the iPhone: No more desktop space compared to a 2560×1440 monitor, but one that is razor sharp and easier to look at.

To get to this pixel density, ASUS has relied upon a panel from Sharp that uses IGZO technology. IGZO (Indium gallium zinc oxide) is a material that replaces amorphous silicon for the active layer of an LCD screen. The main benefit is higher electron mobility that allows for faster reacting, smaller pixels. We have seen non-IGZO panels in smartphones with higher pixel densities, but we don’t have any other current desktop LCDs that offer a higher pixel density than this ASUS display. IGZO also allows for a wide viewing angle.